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"been in trouble ever since I set my suitcase down…"

Category: Design & Crafts

Warped Threads

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Warped Threads is a fairly new addition to the craft community. Formed in 2014 by Nicky and Courtney (last names unknown) from a shared love of tapestry weaving, Warped Threads just released its latest collection. Full of punchy, bright, citrus colors, the line is eye-catching and perfect for spring. Nicky and Courtney make all of their weavings by hand from their studio in Australia, producing unique, one-off creations. You can shop their collection online to see more of their work, or follow their colorful Instagram.

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Takara Design

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Takara is the Portland based jewelry line by Jen Goff. She makes all of her pieces by hand, combining the crafts of rope-making, weaving, natural dyeing, hand-hammering of metals, and the traditional Japanese braiding technique Kumihimo. Goff’s work is inspired by her desire to bring beauty into everyday life, and her pieces combine the roughly hewn weight of metal with the light, airy, and smooth elegance of fiber tassels and fringe. You can purchase her pieces online, or follow her on Instagram or Facebook.

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Laura Slater

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Laura Slater is a textile designer whose graphic, cool-toned patterns are the perfect punch for any home. She hand prints her pieces, creating pillows, lamp shades, blankets, aprons, and tea towels. She also prints small notebooks, envelopes, and even wrapping paper. Her patterns are unique in that they embrace a sense of movement, and are thus imbued with remarkable energy. A UK artist, Slater’s studio is located in West Yorkshire. You can shop her currently available goods from her online shop, or see more of her work by following her Instagram.

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Silvia Song

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Silvia Song is a Bay area based wood turner who creates beautifully simple wooden bowls and other kitchen items. With a background in architecture, Song hand turns, sands, and finishes all of her bowls with a passion for wood and it’s natural properties that is rare. I especially love her indigo-dyed nesting bowls and her walnut coffee dripper. Notably, both of these pieces emerged from collaborations with other artists, a common thread in Song’s work. She has completed projects with the great woodworker Ariel Alasko, ceramics studio Atelier Dion, Heath Ceramics, and natural dyer Kristine Vejar. Her collaborations are vast and inspiring in their creative pairing of talents and materials. Take a look at Song’s work on her web site, or follow her on Instagram.

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Pigeon Toe Ceramics

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Pigeon Toe Ceramics is the porcelain line designed by Lisa Jones and produced out of her Portland studio. Her pieces are utilitarian and clean, featuring soft lines, rounded edges, and simple, organic shapes. But this doesn’t keep her line from being both surprising and eclectic. Jones makes the expected housewares including vessels and planters, but has also branched out into pendant lamps, decorative string lights, hanging chimes, and other decor items. She has even recently expanded into the realm of jewelry, which I’ll be writing about later on the blog. In the meantime, take a look at Pigeon Toe’s housewares in Jones’s Etsy shop.

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Ariel Clute

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Ariel Clute is an artist and jewelry designer who specializes in almost sculptural fiber pieces. Using vibrant tassels and bedazzling them with beads, sequins, and found objects, Clute’s pieces are statement necklaces to the nth degree. Her work is bright, playful, and large. Each piece is hand-wrapped and one-of-a-kind and vary from a single bright tassel on a leather cord to cascades of tassels and beads. Living in Berkeley, California, Clute maintains a fairly private internet presence. You can see some of her work on her website, but I highly suggest following her Instagram if you want to appreciate the sheer variety of fiber pieces she comes up with!

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Camellia Fiber Company

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I stumbled on these gorgeous mill and hand-spun yarns a few months ago and haven’t stopped coveting them since. Dyed with all natural plant or mineral based pigments (or left un-dyed), Camellia Fiber Company’s yarns come in soft and subtle colors. Based in Nashville, Tennessee and headed by Rebecca Seale, CFC uses mostly local alpaca wools, though they dip into other natural fibers as well. Of course, it’s a bit pricey as far as yarn goes, especially their silk-alpaca blend. But the quality and care behind each skein is undeniable! CFC also sells patterns for hats and cowls and even winds skeins into balls for an extra dollar. I especially love her mini-weaving kits, which provide small samples of seven different colors and bulks of yarn. Check out their website or follow Rebecca Seale’s beautiful Instagram.

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Knock Knock Linen

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Knock Knock Linen is a clothing line based out of Dumfries, Scotland. Everything in the line is designed and handmade by husband and wife duo Egle and Gintaras Bibillute, both originally from Lithuania. They use sustainable and natural fabrics, making the majority of their clothing out of linen, though they have also started a winter basics line made from knit alpaca yarn. In fact, their shop is almost an ode to the wonderful properties of linen. One page of their website lists everything to love about linen, including the fact that it is one of the world’s oldest fabrics, it’s natural insect repelling quality (didn’t know this? me either!), the fact that it is non-static (again, didn’t know that!), and it’s biodegradability. In addition to a love for linen, this duo has a real eye for simple, modern design. Their pieces are loose-fitting and flowing, aiming for comfort and practicality over fashion. But this makes for a great line of wardrobe basics. Knock Knock Linen also make clothes for men, including great work shirts and blazers. They also make linen homegoods like napkins, towels, and bedding. You can shop their line on Etsy, though I can tell you the available items change daily! I checked in yesterday to find hundreds of clothing items for men and women. Today it’s down to a handful!

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Gamma Folk

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Lily Piyathaisere’s jewelry line Gamma Folk is in its third year. Piyathaisere started as a graphic designer, transitioned into making cross-stitch jewelry and now creates beautiful fiber statement necklaces. She has also expanded into dyed scarves and other jewelry pieces, but the main backbone of her line remains her colorful, chunky, eye catching necklaces. And what necklaces! Fringed, coiled, hand-dyed, and knotted, Piyathaisere’s pieces are breathtakingly detailed. Taking her inspiration from a variety of sources, including folk art, mysticism, pop culture and the bauhaus, her pieces mix easily with a variety of wardrobe styles. All of her jewelry is handmade in her studio in Brooklyn, NY and you can purchase her work online. I also highly recommend following her Instagram, which is always on point.

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Heidi Anderson

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Heidi Anderson is one half of the talented twin duo behind heidianderika.com. This particular site acts as a showcase for Heidi and Erika’s bright, water color art as well as some of their collaborative drawings. But Heidi is also well known for her southwestern inspired, chunky, ceramic pieces. Heidi specializes agateware, in which different clays are combined together and inlayed into a base clay to form designs. This means that, rather than use glazing for color and/or pattern, any color in her work comes from the natural colors of her clays. In this way, her work relies heavily on geometric pattern and takes a minimalist approach to color, sticking to dusty browns, blacks, and whites. She makes vases, pots, planters, and wonderful containers modeled after vintage milk bottles and jugs. Though she stays out of the spotlight online, you can find more of her work on her blog, at heidibanderson.com, or on her Instagram.

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